Publishing

Podcast: Hummel on “Emancipating Slaves, Enslaving Free Men”

Podcast: Hummel on “Emancipating Slaves, Enslaving Free Men”

in Faculty, Graduate Students, Media, Publishing, Scholarship

Jeffery Rogers Hummel, a professor of economics at San Jose State University, took some time to talk about his book Emancipating Slaves, Enslaving Free Men: A History of the American Civil War – which recently saw the release of its 2nd edition.

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Podcast: Kevin Gutzman – James Madison and the Making of America

Podcast: Kevin Gutzman – James Madison and the Making of America

in Faculty, Graduate Students, Media, Publishing, Scholarship

IHS History Program Officer Phil Magness recently talked with historian and New York Times Bestselling author Kevin R.C. Gutzman about his most recent book, James Madison and the Making of America. In the book, Dr. Gutzman provides voluminous documentation of Madison’s career and the role he played in some of early America’s most formative years.

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Howard Baetjer’s “Free Our Markets: A Citizens’ Guide to Essential Economics”

Howard Baetjer’s “Free Our Markets: A Citizens’ Guide to Essential Economics”

in Faculty, Higher Education, Publishing, Scholarship

A belated congratulations is in order for Towson University Professor and long-time IHS faculty Howard Baetjer on the recent release of his book, Free our Markets: A Citizens’ Guide to Essential Economics.  Here is just some of the praise that Dr. Baetjer is receiving for his work: Central to economics is the study of how people deal with the scarcity of resources. Unfortunately, among humanity’s [...]

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Becoming a Public Intellectual: Inspiration for Op-Eds

in Publishing, Scholarship

During my recent IHS webcast and post on being a public intellectual and getting involved with the media, I suggested a few strategies for getting started. Here’s an example of a versatile issue where everyone can get involved: government financing for stadiums and arenas. They very clearly benefit special interests, but research by economists like Dennis Coates and Brad Humphreys suggests that [...]

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Publishing and Tenure by the Numbers

Publishing and Tenure by the Numbers

in Publishing

Over at his blog, Kids Prefer Cheese, Mike Munger lays down the numbers on writing, publishing articles, tenure, and how this all relates to salary. It takes two journal articles per year to get tenure.  Good journals.  Not great journals.  If you can publish in great journals you can get away with fewer publications.  But barring consistent genius, you should [...]

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7 Guidelines for Writing Worthy Works of Non-Fiction

in Graduate Students, Publishing

In an older blog post on EconLog, Bryan Caplan lays out some guidelines for writing non-fiction that other people will actually want to read. This is great advice to think about when writing for broader audiences as a public intellectual, but it is just as important for academic writing: 1. Pick an important topic.  If someone asks you, “What are [...]

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Find the Right Journal for Your Paper

Find the Right Journal for Your Paper

in Publishing

Finding the right journal for your article can make the difference between fame and obscurity.  At the very least, it can make a difference in signaling the quality of your work.  Many scholars (especially grad students) make the mistake of aiming their papers too low.  Fear of rejection is not a valid excuse for doing this – everyone gets rejected, and [...]

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Bad Titles Hurt Good Papers

Bad Titles Hurt Good Papers

in Publishing

The LSE Public Policy Group has a very helpful guide called “Maximizing the Impacts of Your Research.” I wanted to focus on one key takeaway from Chapter 4: good titles and abstracts are keys to getting cited more frequently, and scholars are typically lousy at creating good titles and abstracts. It’s great if you have a bunch of publications in [...]

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What to Do with Your Rejected Paper

What to Do with Your Rejected Paper

in Publishing

For every article you submit, it’s always a good idea to have a prioritized list of journals you want to submit it to. If your optimal preference rejects your article, in many cases it makes sense simply to turn around and send the article to the next journal on your list. This strategy is wise especially in cases where you [...]

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So They Rejected Your Paper. . .

So They Rejected Your Paper. . .

in Publishing

The article you spent countless hours writing, revising, and altering has been under review for five or more months at a good journal.  You’ve been waiting anxiously for a response, imagining how pretty that journal would look as a publication line on your CV.  You’re proud of this article and can’t think of any reason why it would warrant less [...]

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