Productivity Bookshelf: What Does it Mean to Be More Productive?

By Art Carden
What does it mean to "think bigger"?

Flickr: Mike Rohde

Welcome to the first in a series of posts on my Productivity Bookshelf. Over the next few weeks, months, and maybe years, I’ll be offering a weekly post based on one of my favorite books about personal productivity.

We are going to work our way through these very slowly. You might get a tad impatient, but trust me: this is going to be worthwhile. You have a very large project–be more effective, however you choose to define it–that we are going to break into teensy-tiny sub-projects you can do every week. Tyler Cowen and Alex Tabarrok call their blog Marginal Revolution, and they discuss “small steps toward a better world.” In this space, we are going to take “small steps toward a better [whatever you want to improve],” as maudlin and cliched as that might sound. I look forward to seeing how this is going to go.

Perhaps you’re thinking “I don’t have time for this! I have a dissertation to write/class to teach/job to do!” I beseech you: stick with us and be patient with what you’ve read so far. This is an investment. That dissertation, that class, that job will be better when we’re finished. I guarantee it.

On Friday, we will dive into my favorite book in this genre: Your Best Just Got Better: Work Smarter, Think Bigger, Make More by my friend and collaborator Jason Womack. Before we dive into the text, here are a couple of questions to answer in the comments:

1. What does it mean to “work smarter”?

2. What does it mean to “think bigger”?

3. What does it mean to “make more”?

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There’s still time to apply for our Summer Webinar Series on this very topic!

Image Courtesy of jfaherty17/ Flickr Creative Commons

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Art Carden is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama, a Senior Research Fellow with the Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics, a Research Fellow with the Independent Institute, a Senior Fellow with the Beacon Center of Tennessee, and a regular contributor to Forbes.comLearnLiberty, EconLog, and Kosmos.

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