Google Scholar Opens Up Its Citations

By Sarah Straw

Last week Professor Kevin Vallier wrote about “Using Google Scholar To Your Advantage.” Now everyone can track citations on the service:

 

Here’s how it works. You can quickly identify which articles are yours, by selecting one or more groups of articles that are computed statistically. Then, we collect citations to your articles, graph them over time, and compute your citation metrics – the widely used h-index; the i-10 index, which is simply the number of articles with at least ten citations; and, of course, the total number of citations to your articles. Each metric is computed over all citations and also over citations in articles published in the last five years.

Your citation metrics will update automatically as we find new citations to your articles on the web. You can also set up automated updates for the list of your articles, or you can choose to review the suggested updates. And you can, of course, manually update your profile by adding missing articles, fixing bibliographic errors, and merging duplicate entries.

Read the whole thing here. And click here to get started tracking your citations.  How useful do you find this kind of service?

Leave a Reply